Comment

Weekly Update 5/5

Hey SPEARfam!

SPEAR will not be meeting at our usual time this week, but we need EVERYONE to turn out for the following events:

  1. Mark your calendars for the upcoming Ban the Box direct action at the next CPUC meeting: Monday, May 6th, at 4:30! In response to the President’s ongoing refusal to respond the the Ban the Box campaign, we need EVERYONE, and we mean EVERYONE to show up for the Q&A session, walkout, and Teach-in with formerly incarcerated speakers!!! It is incredibly important that we turn out for this teach-in to unequivocally demonstrate to the University that we are not going away, and that we will not be silent about the University’s complicity in the carceral state.

  1. The Voting Rights committee is holding an informal phone banking event in collaboration with Princeton's brand new Coffee Club, to advocate for a piece of legislation in the New Jersey Congress that would effectively grant those formerly and currently incarcerated with the right to vote. On Monday, May 6, between the hours of 1pm and 5pm, come to Campus Club to call key members of the New Jersey House and the Senate in advocacy for the expansion of the right to vote, along with free gourmet coffee and pastries courtesy of the Coffee Club!

  1. We will be having our end-of-the semester Thai Village celebration dinner on Thursday, May 9 at 7pm! This dinner is something that many of us look back on as the one of the best moments of each semester and what truly solidifies our community. All food costs will be covered by SPEAR. Please RSVP here if you can make it!

SPEARlove,

Kiki, Amanda, and Masha

Princetonspear.com

SPEAR Google Calendar

SPEAR on Twitter

SPEAR on Facebook

Get involved with SPEAR


Comment

Comment

Weekly Update 4/28

Hey SPEARfam!

It’s hard to believe we only have one more week of class left! But SPEAR’s work is far from finished: we are gearing up towards direct action on Ban the Box and Voting Rights in just over a week! And just in time, Zellie Imani of Black Lives Matter Paterson will be here next Friday for a direct action organizing training. What a great time to get involved!!

Has your project wrapped up, or have you been searching for a good time to jump into activism with SPEAR? As always, SPEAR will have its weekly working full group meeting this Monday, March 4th at 8 p.m. in Campus Club, and all are welcome to get involved with the work SPEAR is doing anytime!

Our D.O.V.E.S. team, which hosts social and educational events for young women from a local alternative incarceration facility (and is looking for new members!) will meet at 7:30 p.m. in campus club

New to SPEAR? Fill out this onboarding guide to get fully plugged in to all things SPEAR and to schedule coffee with one of our presidents to talk about how you can get more involved!

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS:

  1. Mark your calendars for the upcoming Ban the Box direct action at the next CPUC meeting: Monday, May 6th, at 4:30! In response to the President’s ongoing refusal to respond the the Ban the Box campaign, we need EVERYONE, and we mean EVERYONE to show up for the Q&A session, walkout, and Teach-in with formerly incarcerated speakers!!! It is incredibly important that we turn out for this teach-in to unequivocally demonstrate to the University that we are not going away, and that we will not be silent about the University’s complicity in the carceral state.

  1. Are you interested in what makes a movement effective and long lasting? About the ways in which organizing can reach and engage larger audiences? About how to build strong coalitions among like-minded and not so like-minded political organizations? Please join YDS - alongside AJP, SPEAR, and Whig-Clio - in hosting a workshop led by Zellie Imani, leader of the Paterson, NJ chapter of Black Lives Matter. The workshop will be taking place on FRIDAY 5/3 in the Whig-Clio Senate Chamber at 4:30pm. In this workshop, Zellie Imani will discuss the tenets of effective activism and how organizing and coalition building help us rally around issues here on campus and beyond.

  1. The Voting Rights committee is holding an informal phone banking event in collaboration with Princeton's brand new Coffee Club, to advocate for a piece of legislation in the New Jersey Congress that would effectively grant those formerly and currently incarcerated with the right to vote. On Monday, May 6, between the hours of 1pm and 5pm, come to Campus Club to call key members of the New Jersey House and the Senate in advocacy for the expansion of the right to vote, along with free gourmet coffee and pastries courtesy of the Coffee Club!

  1. If you are on campus May 18, join NJISJ for the Lock Arms To Unlock Our Kids Rally, to urge Governor Murphy to halt New Jersey’s plans to invest $160 million in building three new youth prisons in NJ to incarcerate kids, and instead to make substantial financial and other reparative and restorative investments in creating a system that builds up kids. Let's lift our voices to support the introduction of historic youth justice legislation! SPEAR will try to put together transportation: stay tuned for more information.

1:30 RALLY: Meet at West Side High School, 403 S. Orange Ave, Newark

3:00 MARCH: March to South Orange Ave & Grove Street, where NJ Submitted a Letter of Intent to Build a New Youth Prison, to Lock Arms Around the Site

WHEN: May 18, 2019 at 1:30pm - 5:30pm

Right now, sign the Open Letter to Transform Youth Justice here.

Headlines:

The Death Chamber Next Door Jeremy Busby, The Marshall Project.

“Being incarcerated at the prison that carried out the death penalty had clearly penetrated my soul. It was as though a small part me died with each execution, and, unwilling to lose any more of my being than I had already, I was determined to make this execution different.”

Cops Morphing Into Social Workers Is Not a Solution Helen Redmond, FilterMag.

Police encroachment into social work territory is a problem—one that human rights advocates can’t ignore. Because it blinds us to the continuing, large-scale criminalization of marginalized drug users, and obscures chronic underinvestment in non-carceral systems of care.

The Study Group Bringing bell hooks to Prisons Emily Nonko, NextCity.

“It’s a big undertaking — patriarchy is the cornerstone of our culture,” he says. “But it’s solvable. Rape culture can be addressed. I don’t think young men in prison need to be having this conversation more or less than any other men. It just so happens we have access to, and have built capacity around, serving that population.”

‘When Deported, You Become Nothing’ Raul Roman and Rafe H. Andrews, Politico.

“We wanted to put names and faces to the story of deportation—a story that is so often told only through statistics. Numbers alone can’t capture what it’s like to spend years or decades building a life, finding work, starting a family—only to be torn away and made to return to the violent and impoverished place you fled.”

ENDLESS TRIALS: Baltimore Police Tried to Kill Keith Davis Jr. Prosecutors Have Been Trying to Convict Him of Murder Ever Since. Alice Speri, The Intercept.

“The mentality behind that was that it would be a lot easier if he was dead,” Smith told The Intercept. “Because then he wouldn’t be able to tell his story. There would be no alternate version of events; there would only be the police’s version of events.”

Florida House Approves Requiring People To Repay Criminal Fines, Fees Before They Can Vote Sam Levine, Huffpost.

“Critics say the legislation amounts to a poll tax and violates a constitutional amendment that voters overwhelmingly approved in November to allow people with felonies to vote.”

SPEARlove,

Kiki, Amanda, and Masha

Princetonspear.com

SPEAR Google Calendar

SPEAR on Twitter

SPEAR on Facebook

Get involved with SPEAR!

Comment

Comment

Weekly Update 4/21

Hey SPEARfam!

As the semester hurtles towards a thrilling conclusion, SPEAR is still moving full steam ahead!! The Ban the Box campaign is heating up towards direct action on May 8th; Voting Rights is planning a phonebanking event to advocate for reenfranchisement in New Jersey; production is beginning on the Project Solidarity Zine; and FISAP, Re-entry and DOVES programming is in full swing.

Has your project wrapped up, or have you been searching for a good time to jump into activism with SPEAR? As always, SPEAR will have its weekly working full group meeting this Monday, March 4th at 8 p.m. in Campus Club, and all are welcome to get involved with the work SPEAR is doing anytime!

Our D.O.V.E.S. team, which hosts social and educational events for young women from a local alternative incarceration facility (and is looking for new members!) will meet at 7:30 p.m. in campus club.

New to SPEAR? Fill out this onboarding guide to get fully plugged in to all things SPEAR and to schedule coffee with one of our presidents to talk about how you can get more involved!

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS:

  1. Show solidarity with our friends at Rutgers for Petey Greene’s Prison Awareness week from April 22nd to April 26th! SPEAR will be putting together a van to travel to the Voting Rights event on Tuesday, April 23rd, leaving at 7:45 from behind Frist. Please RSVP on this 2-second form so we know who is coming!

  1. Mark your calendars for the upcoming Ban the Box direct action at the next CPUC meeting: Monday, May 6th, at 4:30! In response to the President’s ongoing refusal to respond the the Ban the Box campaign, we need EVERYONE, and we mean EVERYONE to show up for the Q&A session, walkout, and Teach-in with formerly incarcerated speakers!!! It is incredibly important that we turn out for this teach-in to unequivocally demonstrate to the University that we are not going away, and that we will not be silent about the University’s complicity in the carceral state.

  2. The Voting Rights committee is holding an informal phone banking event in collaboration with Princeton's brand new Coffee Club, to advocate for a piece of legislation in the New Jersey Congress that would effectively grant those formerly and currently incarcerated with the right to vote. On Monday, May 6, between the hours of 1pm and 5pm, come to Campus Club to call key members of the New Jersey House and the Senate in advocacy for the expansion of the right to vote, along with free gourmet coffee and pastries courtesy of the Coffee Club!

  1. Check out this week’s Woke Wednesdays video with the Ban the Box Campaign! Explore the common app’s decision to remove the question on previous convictions, leaving with each university, including Princeton, the choice of banning the box. Woke Wednesdays asks students: should the University should consider conviction history when making admissions decisions despite how the criminal justice system disproportionately targets communities of color? Check out the video here, and don’t forget to sign the Ban the Box Petition !!!

  1. From our friends at YDS, Whig-Clio, College Dems, and AJP: Have you been thinking a lot about what the current state of unionization is here in the US? What kind of relationship it has with our efforts and other forms of political organizing, especially around the upcoming election? Its relationship to labor movements internationally? We’re excited to announce our upcoming event with Kevin Cooper, the Deputy Political Director of the Communications Workers of America, which is the largest telecommunications workers union in the country and one of the most influential unions in progressive politics today.  He’s coming to campus to talk with us about political organizing through unionization, its relevance in today's tumultuous political climate both in America and internationally, and why it matters in the context of other political movements and our own work as feminists with intersectional aims—labor rights and reproductive justice go hand-in-hand! The event will take place on Friday, April 26th from 4:30-6:00pm at Frist 302, and it will be preceded by a private, boba meet-and-greet chat from 3:00-4:00pm in Butler 1915 room (RSVP here if you want to join us, and we will let folks know if they can join on a first-come, first-serve basis)

  2. This spring, The Nassau Literary Review is organizing its sixth annual Collegiate Literary Conference on the theme of “Art as Resistance: Identity and Politics in the Arts”. We would love to see you at any or all of the events listed here!

TIME/LOCATION: 10 AM to 4 PM on Saturday, April 27th, 2018 in Lewis Library 138

FEATURING:

  • a panel with BOMB Magazine (Raluca Albu), Winter Tangerine (Yasmin Belkhyr), The Nassau Literary Review (Priya Vulchi), and Princeton’s Ellipses Slam Poetry Team (Michael “Scooter” Liapin)

  • student readings in conversation with Jason Schneiderman.

  • workshop led by Alicia Grullon entitled “A Connection to Power: On Art, Land, and Food Sovereignty” (REQUIRED registration here, limited space)

  • keynote address by Nicole Dennis-Benn, author of the award-winning novel, Here Comes the Sun

Please RSVP to the conference using this form.

Headlines:

Is Prison Necessary? Ruth Wilson Gilmore Might Change Your Mind  Rachel Kushner, The New York Times

“I get where you’re coming from,” she said. “But how about this: Instead of asking whether anyone should be locked up or go free, why don’t we think about why we solve problems by repeating the kind of behavior that brought us the problem in the first place?” She was asking them to consider why, as a society, we would choose to model cruelty and vengeance….where life is precious, life is precious.” *HIGHLY RECOMMEND!!*

Torture does happen in N.J.'s prison, former inmates say. It's called solitary confinement. New Jersey Star-Ledger.

“Under international law, more than 15 days of isolated confinement can be considered to be torture. Yet in New Jersey, some people are held in isolation for months. For 22-23 hours a day they are left only with a bed and their thoughts in a room that's typically no more than 8-by-10 feet.” *Includes narratives from Mark, Lydia, and Ron!!*

 

Congress Considers Making College More Accessible To People In Prison Elissa Nadworny, NPR.

“Now, there's renewed interest in giving adults behind bars better access to higher education. A new bipartisan bill in Congress would allow incarcerated people to use federal Pell Grants — designed for low-income students — to pay for higher education, including college classes and workforce training.”

In New Effort to Deter Migrants, Barr Withholds Bail to Asylum Seekers Michael D. Shear and Katie Benner, The New York Times.

“The Trump administration on Tuesday took another significant step to discourage migrants from seeking asylum, issuing an order that could keep thousands of them in jail indefinitely while they wait for a resolution of their asylum requests. The order — which directs immigration judges to deny some migrants a chance to post bail….could undermine the basic rights of people seeking safety in the United States….‘We are talking about people who are fleeing for their lives, seeking safety. And our response is just lock them up.’”

Border Patrol Holds Hundreds of Migrants in Growing Tent City Away From Prying Eyes Justin Glawe and Justin Hamel, The New York Times.

“Five U.S. Army tents meant for battlefield hospitals have been repurposed to hold men, women, and children, including infants. Two of the tents were erected over the past week, expanding the facility’s capacity by several hundred people. The tents are tightly surrounded by fences topped with barbed wire, leaving virtually no space for people to roam outside. Inside the tents, according to a congresswoman who was granted access, hundreds languish in fetid conditions.”

SPEARlove,

Kiki, Amanda, and Masha

Princetonspear.com

SPEAR Google Calendar

SPEAR on Twitter

SPEAR on Facebook

Get involved with SPEAR!


Comment

Comment

Weekly Update 4/14

Hey SPEARfam!

First of all, a huge, heartfelt thank you to all of you who made the SPEAR conference possible. We have heard nothing but rave reviews, and the conference had a wide reach outside of Princeton’s campus and facilitated many transformative connections and educational experiences for all those who attended.

We are especially grateful for the hard work of our main organizing team, Kiki, Micah, Frelicia, Equia, Jackson, and Bhavani, as well as all the volunteers and hosts who helped everything run smoothly.

As always, SPEAR will have its weekly working full group meeting this Monday, March 4th at 8 p.m. in Campus Club, and all are welcome to get involved with the work SPEAR is doing anytime!

Our D.O.V.E.S. team, which hosts social and educational events for young women from a local alternative incarceration facility (and is looking for new members!) will meet at 7:30 p.m. in campus club, and our conference team will meet during the weekly meeting as well.

New to SPEAR? Fill out this onboarding guide to get fully plugged in to all things SPEAR and to schedule coffee with one of our presidents to talk about how you can get more involved!

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS:

  1. The Ban the Box Campaign x Woke Wednesdays watch party and discussion is rescheduled for Wednesday, April 17th at 5pm in CAF 105! Come through to support the Ban the Box campaign in a fun and casual setting! We will premiere the video, hold a discussion afterwards, and enjoy food -- what more could you ask for?

  2. Join Petey Greene, PTI, and more on Monday, April 15th, 4:30 - 7pm Lewis Library Room 120 for the Prison and the Academy Symposium XIII: “Prison Education and Engaged Scholarship.”“Engaged Scholarship” denotes a rapidly growing movement to connect teaching and research “to our most pressing social, civic, and ethical problems” (Boyer, 1996). Ideally, engaged scholars work on equal footing with community partners as they co-create knowledge for mutual benefit. That ideal can be very difficult to achieve in practice. Prison education, including but not limited to combined courses, represents a rich opportunity for scholars inside and outside carceral institutions to learn with and educate each other. This panel of engaged scholars will offer short presentations about a range of teaching, research, and policy initiatives.

  3. Solitary: A Conversation with Albert Woodfox

Albert Woodfox, prison activist and Black Panther, survived more than four decades of solitary confinement in Louisiana’s notorious Angola state prison—punished for a crime he did not commit. In his new book, Solitary, he tells his story of struggle, transformation, and hope.

On Wednesday, April 17, 2019 from 5 PM to 8 PM in JRR, Growing up impoverished in segregated New Orleans, Woodfox was arrested multiple times for petty crimes as a teenager. Cycling in and out of jail as a young man, he learned how to survive the brutal, violent world of prison. After being exposed to the teachings of the Black Panther Party while incarcerated, Woodfox dedicated his life to the struggle for justice, organizing his fellow prisoners to challenge the inhumane conditions behind bars. in 1972, he and another Panther were falsely accused of killing a white prison guard. For this, Woodfox and two comrades, known as the “Angola 3," would collectively spend over a century in solitary confinement: 23 hours a day in a 6’x9’ cell. Since winning his release in February 2016, Woodfox has traveled extensively throughout the United States and Europe advocating for the freedom of political prisoners and an end to all forms of torture.

The Department of African American Studies welcomes Albert Woodfox for a conversation with Professor Joshua Guild about his remarkable life and inspiring story. Book signing to follow.

Link to the facebook event here.

  1. Race, Gender, and the Law - Anita Hill with Imani Perry.  Thursday, April 18, 2019 at 8 PM – 9 PM in Richardson Auditorium.

Anita Hill is University Professor of Social Policy, Law, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Brandeis University.  She is Of Counsel in Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll’s Civil Rights & Employment Practice group. In December, 2017 she was named as the chair of the Commission on Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality in the Workplace, formed to combat sexual harassment across the entertainment industry.  Professor Hill’s books include Reimagining Equality: Stories of Gender, Race and Finding Home (2011) and her autobiography Speaking Truth to Power (1997). She also co-edited, with Emma Coleman Jordan she co-edited, Race, Gender and Power in America: The Legacy of the Hill-Thomas Hearings (1995).  Professor Hill’s commentary has been published in TIME, Newsweek, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, and Ms. Magazine, including a September, 2018 column in the New York Times addressing how the Senate Judiciary Committee should conduct the Kavanaugh hearings to avoid the mistakes of the 1991 Clarence Thomas hearings.

Imani Perry is Princeton’s Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies and faculty associate in the Program in Law and Public Affairs and Gender and Sexuality Studies.  She has written and taught on a number of topics regarding race and African American culture. She has published five books, including Looking for Lorraine: The Radiant Life of Lorraine Hansberry  (2018); Vexy Thing: On Gender and Liberation (2018) and the upcoming Breathe: A Letter to My Sons.

Free Ticket Required:  Tickets for Princeton University members will be distributed at the University Ticketing Office in Frist Campus Center between 12 and 5 pm while supplies last.  Distribution to Students begins Tuesday, April 2, with a limit of one ticket per TigerCard (individuals can present a maximum of two TigerCards). Distribution to Staff/Faculty will begin Thursday, April 4 at 12pm (again, an individual can present up to two TigerCards).  General Public Tickets will be available starting at 12 pm on Monday April 8 online at tickets.princeton.edu or through the Frist Ticketing Office, with a limit of two tickets per person. Doors to Richardson Auditorium will open at 7:30 pm, and there will be a wait line for those unable to obtain a ticket in advance.  

5. Mark your calendars for Petey Greene at Rutgers’ Prison Awareness week from April 22nd to April 26th! SPEAR will follow up soon with logistics on how we can travel and show our support for the incredible work they are doing!  

Headlines:

Jussie Smollett and the Impulse to Punish Josie Duffy Rice, The New Yorker.

If Smollett lied, it is deeply insulting, not only to the people of Chicago but to anyone who has been victimized because of his race or sexual orientation. But not all immoral behavior necessitates criminal punishment. To stem the tide of mass incarceration, we must get comfortable with less punishment, even for some of the people we find morally reprehensible.

Family Separation Has Scarred These Kids For Life  Angelina Chapin, HuffPost.

“In some ways the hardest part is the aftermath [of family separation],” said Neha Desai, the director of immigration at the National Center for Youth Law. “You’re putting your life back together and uncovering layer upon layer of how the trauma has wreaked havoc on every aspect of your life.”

When Prisons Cut Off Visits—Indefinitely Christie Thompson, The Marshall Project.

“It’s been nearly 25 years since Michigan adopted a controversial visitation policy. Families have been fighting it ever since…’There’s really not a lot left of a constitutional right to visiting after that case,” said David Fathi, director of the ACLU National Prison Project. “This vital form of association … can be taken away pretty much at whim.’”

Money Changed Everything for Me in Prison Morgan Godwin, The Marshall Project.

“Does that mean prison “worked” for me? Or have I managed to thrive just because I was among the 1 percent of prisoners in the first place?”

Chicago’s Ankle Monitors Can Call and Record Kids Without Their Consent Kira Lerner, CityLab.

“The stated purpose of these devices is to communicate with the people wearing the devices, but they are raising concerns among civil liberties watchers that they are actually a mechanism for surveilling the conversations of these kids and those around them—and potentially for using the recordings in criminal cases.”

SPEARlove,

Kiki, Amanda, and Masha

Princetonspear.com

SPEAR Google Calendar

SPEAR on Twitter

SPEAR on Facebook

Get involved with SPEAR!

Comment

Comment

Weekly Update 4/7

Hey SPEARfam!

It’s time to GET HYPEEEE for our annual SPEAR conference! We are going to need all hands on deck to make this conference happen.

As always, SPEAR will have its weekly working full group meeting this Monday, March 4th at 8 p.m. in Campus Club, and all are welcome to get involved with the work SPEAR is doing anytime!

Our D.O.V.E.S. team, which hosts social and educational events for young women from a local alternative incarceration facility (and is looking for new members!) will meet at 7:30 p.m. in campus club, and our conference team will meet during the weekly meeting as well.

New to SPEAR? Fill out this onboarding guide to get fully plugged in to all things SPEAR and to schedule coffee with one of our presidents to talk about how you can get more involved!

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS:

  1. Conference is coming up in less than a week, and we're incredibly excited!  Without the aid of volunteers, SPEAR's annual conference wouldn't be possible, so we're reaching out to ask for your time, aid, and presence this weekend – from Friday (beginning at 3PM) to Saturday evening. Here are examples of tasks we'd need help with:

- Carrying boxes of food and supplies between rooms

- Helping to direct attendees to the correct locations

- Manning registration (including late registration) on Friday and Saturday

- Driving, if you have both a license and access to a vehicle

If you'd be interested in helping out, please jot down your name and contact on this Google Sheet!  Please list your name and number, and we'll consider you on-call for the range of times you've indicated.

  1. The Ban the Box Campaign x Woke Wednesdays watch party and discussion is rescheduled for Wednesday, April 17th at 5pm in CAF 105! Come through to support the Ban the Box campaign in a fun and casual setting! We will premiere the video, hold a discussion afterwards, and enjoy food -- what more could you ask for?

  2. Join Petey Greene, PTI, and more on Monday, April 15th, 4:30 - 7pm Lewis Library Room 120 for the Prison and the Academy Symposium XIII: “Prison Education and Engaged Scholarship.”“Engaged Scholarship” denotes a rapidly growing movement to connect teaching and research “to our most pressing social, civic, and ethical problems” (Boyer, 1996). Ideally, engaged scholars work on equal footing with community partners as they co-create knowledge for mutual benefit. That ideal can be very difficult to achieve in practice. Prison education, including but not limited to combined courses, represents a rich opportunity for scholars inside and outside carceral institutions to learn with and educate each other. This panel of engaged scholars will offer short presentations about a range of teaching, research, and policy initiatives.

  3. Solitary: A Conversation with Albert Woodfox

Albert Woodfox, prison activist and Black Panther, survived more than four decades of solitary confinement in Louisiana’s notorious Angola state prison—punished for a crime he did not commit. In his new book, Solitary, he tells his story of struggle, transformation, and hope.

On Wednesday, April 17, 2019 from 5 PM to 8 PM in JRR, Growing up impoverished in segregated New Orleans, Woodfox was arrested multiple times for petty crimes as a teenager. Cycling in and out of jail as a young man, he learned how to survive the brutal, violent world of prison. After being exposed to the teachings of the Black Panther Party while incarcerated, Woodfox dedicated his life to the struggle for justice, organizing his fellow prisoners to challenge the inhumane conditions behind bars. in 1972, he and another Panther were falsely accused of killing a white prison guard. For this, Woodfox and two comrades, known as the “Angola 3," would collectively spend over a century in solitary confinement: 23 hours a day in a 6’x9’ cell. Since winning his release in February 2016, Woodfox has traveled extensively throughout the United States and Europe advocating for the freedom of political prisoners and an end to all forms of torture.

The Department of African American Studies welcomes Albert Woodfox for a conversation with Professor Joshua Guild about his remarkable life and inspiring story. Book signing to follow.

Link to the facebook event here.

  1. Race, Gender, and the Law - Anita Hill with Imani Perry.  Thursday, April 18, 2019 at 8 PM – 9 PM in Richardson Auditorium.

Anita Hill is University Professor of Social Policy, Law, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Brandeis University.  She is Of Counsel in Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll’s Civil Rights & Employment Practice group. In December, 2017 she was named as the chair of the Commission on Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality in the Workplace, formed to combat sexual harassment across the entertainment industry.  Professor Hill’s books include Reimagining Equality: Stories of Gender, Race and Finding Home (2011) and her autobiography Speaking Truth to Power (1997). She also co-edited, with Emma Coleman Jordan she co-edited, Race, Gender and Power in America: The Legacy of the Hill-Thomas Hearings (1995).  Professor Hill’s commentary has been published in TIME, Newsweek, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, and Ms. Magazine, including a September, 2018 column in the New York Times addressing how the Senate Judiciary Committee should conduct the Kavanaugh hearings to avoid the mistakes of the 1991 Clarence Thomas hearings.

Imani Perry is Princeton’s Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies and faculty associate in the Program in Law and Public Affairs and Gender and Sexuality Studies.  She has written and taught on a number of topics regarding race and African American culture. She has published five books, including Looking for Lorraine: The Radiant Life of Lorraine Hansberry  (2018); Vexy Thing: On Gender and Liberation (2018) and the upcoming Breathe: A Letter to My Sons.

Free Ticket Required:  Tickets for Princeton University members will be distributed at the University Ticketing Office in Frist Campus Center between 12 and 5 pm while supplies last.  Distribution to Students begins Tuesday, April 2, with a limit of one ticket per TigerCard (individuals can present a maximum of two TigerCards). Distribution to Staff/Faculty will begin Thursday, April 4 at 12pm (again, an individual can present up to two TigerCards).  General Public Tickets will be available starting at 12 pm on Monday April 8 online at tickets.princeton.edu or through the Frist Ticketing Office, with a limit of two tickets per person. Doors to Richardson Auditorium will open at 7:30 pm, and there will be a wait line for those unable to obtain a ticket in advance.  

Headlines:

Why Did Brett Kavanaugh Change His Mind About the Rights of Religious Minorities in the Execution Chamber? Mark Joseph Stern, Slate.

“On Thursday night, the justices barred Texas from killing Murphy, a Buddhist, because the state refused to let a Buddhist spiritual adviser accompany him in the execution chamber. Yet just last month, a majority of the court let Alabama kill Ray, a Muslim, even though the state would not let his imam accompany him during the lethal injection. At least one conservative justice, Brett Kavanaugh, intervened to help Murphy but let Ray die alone. Why?”

Police release body-cam video of Willie McCoy killing, showing him asleep in car Sam Levin, The Guardian.

“‘They were never trying to be peaceful or de-escalate the situation. It’s about being rough and tough,’ said Marc, adding that the police’s plan seemed to be ‘If he moves, I’m gonna kill him’...’This was a racist act.’”

Inside America’s Black Box: A Rare Look at the Violence of Incarceration Shaila Dewan, The New York Times.

“Prisons are the black boxes of our society. With their vast complexes and razor wire barriers, everyone knows where they are, but few know what goes on inside...So when prisoners go on hunger strikes or work strikes, or engage in deadly riots, the public rarely understands exactly why. How could they? Many people harbor a vague belief that whatever treatment prisoners get, they surely must deserve. It is a view perpetuated by a lack of detail.”

When “Violent Offenders” Commit Nonviolent Crimes Eli Hager, The Marshall Project.

“If you’ve been following the efforts to reduce this country’s swollen jail and prison population, you’ve probably heard the phrase “low-level, nonviolent offenders” quite a few times….Yet in reality, many of the “violent offenders” in U.S. prisons are there for crimes that not everyone would classify as violent.

SPEARlove,

Kiki, Amanda, and Masha

Princetonspear.com

SPEAR Google Calendar

SPEAR on Twitter

SPEAR on Facebook

Get involved with SPEAR!


Comment

Comment

Weekly Update 3/31

Hey SPEARfam!

As always, SPEAR will have its weekly working full group meeting this Monday, March 4th at 8 p.m. in Campus Club, and all are welcome to get involved with the work SPEAR is doing anytime!

Our D.O.V.E.S. team, which hosts social and educational events for young women from a local alternative incarceration facility (and is looking for new members!) will meet at 7:30 p.m. in campus club, and our conference team will meet during the weekly meeting as well.

New to SPEAR? Fill out this onboarding guide to get fully plugged in to all things SPEAR and to schedule coffee with one of our presidents to talk about how you can get more involved!

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS:

  1. The Ban the Box campaign and Woke Wednesdays will be holding a watch party and discussion following the viewing of the newest installment featuring the Admissions Opportunity Campaign. Join WW and BtB on Wednesday, April 3 in the Carl A. Fields Center Room 105 at 5PM to have some fun, eat some snacks, and dismantle the carceral state!

  1. We are sure you have already registered for our annual SPEAR Conference: now, we need you all to host the many students coming in from around the country to attend on the weekend of April 12th and 13th! Please fill out this form here.

  2. From a SPEAR alumni: My name is Clarissa Kimmey (Class of 2016) and while living in Mexico for a Fulbright I've been volunteering with a migrant shelter based in Oaxaca City. Between 90 and 180 migrants and refugees from all over Latin American pass through the shelter each month -- even though it's managed by a team of just 4 people. They could really use some extra help. They wouldn't have any money to hire an intern, but if there's one thing I love and miss dearly about Princeton, it's all the funding to do incredible and important work across the world. So, I'm seeking an intern for them. This would be a great experience for anyone interested in immigration legal or humanitarian services, but you could honestly be of help down here doing whatever it is you enjoy doing. My main goal while I'm here is setting up more resources for people seeking asylum in the US, but some of the most fun I've had is setting up an art class for the children staying at the center. Distractions and diversions are really important for the people (of all ages!) staying here. On a non-work note, Oaxaca would be a wonderful place to spend a summer (it's quickly become my favorite city in the world). I'll probably be around until July-ish, so would love to help out with basic orientation down here. I know it's a little past internship-finding time in Princeton, but if you're interested and want to learn more, shoot me an email at clarissakimmey@gmail.com. ¡Saludos!

Headlines:

The Human Costs Of Kamala Harris’ War On Truancy Molly Redden, The Huffington Post.

“Preventing truancy, she argued, was not just about the noble goal of ensuring every child’s education, but a matter of averting future criminals. So it only made sense for the city’s top law enforcement officer to get involved. Harris filed charges against a handful of San Francisco parents whose elementary school-aged children were consistently missing school.”

Why the Plan to Legalize Marijuana in New Jersey Suddenly Unraveled Nick Corasaniti and Jesse McKinley, The New York Times.

“A disagreement existed among lawmakers about how far to go regarding the social justice component in the legalization bill: Fissures grew over whether it was necessary to expunge criminal records for marijuana-related offenses for those found with as much as five pounds of the drug.”

Fear of a Black Homeland: The Strange Tale of the FBI’s Fictional “Black Identity Extremist” Movement” Alice Speri, The Intercept.

“The only connection between the men referenced in the FBI’s “black identity extremism” report, besides their race, is a thread of anger at police violence.”

Invisible Walls Zoeann Murphy, Jon Gerberg, Jorge Ribas and Jesse Mesner-Hage, The Washington Post.

“From Guatemala, Mexico, and California come the stories of lives altered by Trump’s crackdown on immigration”

SPEARlove,

Kiki, Amanda, and Masha

Princetonspear.com

SPEAR Google Calendar

SPEAR on Twitter

SPEAR on Facebook

Get involved with SPEAR!

Comment

Comment

Weekly Update 3/24

Hey SPEARfam!

We hope you all had a lovely and relaxing Spring Break! I’m sorry to say that we are back to the grind of the semester, but never fear! As always, SPEAR will have its weekly working full group meeting this Monday, March 4th at 8 p.m. in Campus Club so you can jump back into the semester in a meaningful way.

Our D.O.V.E.S. team, which hosts social and educational events for young women from a local alternative incarceration facility (and is looking for new members!) will meet at 7:30 p.m. in campus club, and our conference team will meet during the weekly meeting as well.

New to SPEAR? Fill out this onboarding guide to get fully plugged in to all things SPEAR and to schedule coffee with one of our presidents to talk about how you can get more involved!

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS:

  1. Please come out the Monday after Spring Break, 3/25, at 4:20 pm in Betts Auditorium (in the architecture building) for the penultimate CPUC meeting of the semester! We need your support to continue pressuring the administration and show them that we have not forgotten about their hostile responses to the Ban the Box campaign. This meeting, engaged faculty will also be asking questions to demonstrate that the campaign is building momentum and has wide support across campus.  Previous demonstrations have garnered the attention of national media and provoked discussions among high level administrators, so your presence matters! Contact Michaela (msdaniel@princeton.edu) and Gina (gmfeliz@princeton.edu) with any questions.

  2. This Sunday, March 31st at 2pm, SPEAR will be taking a trip to the opening  the exhibit Redaction, featuring art from Titus Kaphar and poetry from Reginald Dwayne Betts based on lawsuits filed by the Civil Rights Corps (CRC) on behalf of people incarcerated because of an inability to pay court fines and fees at MoMa. We will be leaving at 12:30 p.m. to drive up to see the exhibit and the opening panel, and likely returning around 5 p.m. -- all travel costs will be covered. If you would like to attend, please fill out this 5-second RSVP form to help us coordinate logistics prior to the event.

  3. We are sure you have already registered for our annual SPEAR Conference: now, we need you all to host the many students coming in from around the country to attend on the weekend of April 12th and 13th! Please fill out this form here.

Headlines:

"Medicare for All" Is Missing a Vital Group: The Incarcerated Ashwin Vasan, The Marshall Project.

“Nearly 60 percent of Americans support some version of “Medicare for All,” an expansion of federally-funded health insurance to cover everybody. But no one is talking about making federal health insurance truly “for all” by extending eligibility to the 2.2 million people incarcerated in this country.”

A Racial Pattern So Obvious, Even the Supreme Court Might See It Garrett Epps, The Atlantic.

“The specific issue the Court will hear is whether, during a murder trial in 2010, a Mississippi prosecutor named Doug Evans deliberately used “peremptory challenges” to remove potential jurors because of race. If the U.S. Supreme Court agrees, then Flowers’s conviction for multiple murders in 1996 will be set aside. Of course, if that happens, Evans can simply try Flowers again on the same charges. And why wouldn’t he? Evans has already prosecuted Flowers for the same crime six times over the past 20 years.”

Pregnant Behind Bars: What We Do And Don't Know About Pregnancy And Incarceration Carolyn Sufrin, NPR.

“Pregnant incarcerated people are one of the most marginalized and forgotten groups in our country, and the way that I think about it is that this is a reflection of the notion that women who don't count don't get counted….They can be shackled during childbirth. They can be placed in solitary confinement. They can have their complaints of contractions, bleeding, labor complaints ignored and deliver babies in their jail cells or prison cells.”

SPEARlove,

Kiki, Amanda, and Masha

Princetonspear.com

SPEAR Google Calendar

SPEAR on Twitter

SPEAR on Facebook

Get involved with SPEAR!


Comment

Comment

Weekly Update 3/10

Hey SPEARfam!


What a week! We are so grateful to the incredible organizers who made so many incredible events happen this past week - from a moving panel of voting rights activists to a call to action to free the political prisoners still held captive in this country today to building community on campus and beyond, SPEAR members truly made an impact on the campus and state conversation this week.


As always, SPEAR will have its weekly working full group meeting this Monday, March 4th at 8 p.m. in Campus Club. Before breaking out in our projects to continue building our campaigns, we will take a little time to acknowledge the need for self care by writing encouraging mid-terms notes to our friends.



Our D.O.V.E.S. team, which hosts social and educational events for young women from a local alternative incarceration facility (and is looking for new members!) will meet at 7:30 p.m. in campus club, and our conference team meets at 11:30 on Sundays (reach out to Kiki for more details).


New to SPEAR? Fill out this onboarding guide to get fully plugged in to all things SPEAR and to schedule coffee with one of our presidents to talk about how you can get more involved!


  1. Please come out the Monday after Spring Break, 3/25, at 4:20 pm in Betts Auditorium (in the architecture building) for the penultimate CPUC meeting of the semester! We need your support to continue pressuring the administration and show them that we have not forgotten about their hostile responses to the Ban the Box campaign. This meeting, engaged faculty will also be asking questions to demonstrate that the campaign is building momentum and has wide support across campus.  Previous demonstrations have garnered the attention of national media and provoked discussions among high level administrators, so your presence matters! Contact Michaela (msdaniel@princeton.edu) and Gina (gmfeliz@princeton.edu) with any questions.

  2. Black Feminisms across the Americas: A Tribute to Political Activist Marielle Franco will take place on March 14, 2019 (1:45-4:30 pm), at the 399 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building. The symposium is being organized by the Brazil LAB, and will bring together Brazilian and U.S. critical thinkers and activists, culminating with a keynote address by Angela Davis at McCosh 10 (5:00-7:00 pm), and a follow-up discussion with students and faculty on March 15 (10:00am-2:00pm).

  1. Registration is now open for our annual SPEAR Conference!!!! Hosted on April 12-13, this year’s conference will assess the mainstream criminal justice reform movement’s tendency to focus only on non-violent and drug offenses, often excluding those convicted of violent and sexual offenses from the movement. Princeton students should register for the conference here.

Headlines:

Formerly incarcerated speakers advocate for the voting rights of the incarcerated in a SPEAR organized panel Marie-Rose Sheinerman, The Daily Princetonian.

“I have experienced the extremes of what it means to be a citizen,” he said. “As a combat veteran, I was highly esteemed by society, and then as an incarcerated person, I essentially had my humanity stripped [from] me.”

Reckoning With Violence Michelle Alexander, The New York Times.

“We must face violent crime honestly and courageously if we are ever to end mass incarceration and provide survivors what they truly want and need to heal…. imprisonment isn’t just an inadequate tool; it’s often enormously counterproductive — leaving survivors and their communities worse off.”

‘What Would I Have Done if I Would Have Killed Her That Night?’ Ten months in a class for men who hit women. Lauren Justice, The New York Times.

“What would happen if men were encouraged to challenge their belief systems about women and relationships, power and control before they were forced to by a 911 call?”

The Opioid Crisis Isn’t White Abdullah Shihipar, The New York Times.

“Labeling the opioid crisis as “white” risks overlooking the very real damage experienced by black, Latino and Native American communities….This crisis is a reminder that anyone can become addicted to drugs. Our empathy should not be conditional.

Would Expanded Criminal Background Checks Hurt Federal Job Applicants? Justin George, The Marshall Project.

“The Trump administration wants applicants for federal jobs and contractor positions to divulge whether they have gone through diversion programs such as drug courts that are meant to help people avoid prison. But critics say the move undermines the whole idea of sentencing alternatives that are designed to keep permanent blemishes off participants’ records, avoiding negative background checks that can limit jobs, housing and education.”

‘You Have to Pay With Your Body’: The Hidden Nightmare of Sexual Violence on the Border Manny Fernandez, The New York Times.

“On America’s southern border, migrant women and girls are the victims of sexual assaults that most often go unreported, uninvestigated and unprosecuted. Even as women around the world are speaking out against sexual misconduct, migrant women on the border live in the shadows of the #MeToo movement.”

Lynch Mobs Killed Latinos Across the West. Descendants Want It Known. Simon Romero, The New York Times.

“Descendants of lynching victims are now casting attention on one of the grimmest campaigns of racist terror in the American West: the lynching of thousands of men, women and children of Mexican descent from the mid-19th century until well into the 20th century.”

White Women Were Avid Slaveowners, a New Book Shows Parul Sehgal, The New York Times.

White slave-owning women were ubiquitous. Not only did they profit from, and passionately defend, slavery, but the institution “was their freedom.”

KiKi’s review: “Speaks on recognizing the power dynamics between groups that are both disempowered in their own ways, which I think is an important nuance!”

In Defense of Harvey Weinstein’s Harvard Lawyer Conor Friedersdorf, The Atlantic.
“These students might not realize it, but they are creating a disincentive for ambitious young legal academics to undertake the defense of any potentially controversial client, including indigent men who stand accused of rape or sexual assault. That raises the odds of wrongful convictions, especially among the poor.”

A Harvard Law School Professor Defends His Decision to Represent Harvey Weinstein  Isaac Chotiner, The New Yorker.

A Q&A with the Harvard Law professor on Harvey Weinstein’s defense team.


SPEARlove,


Kiki, Amanda, and Masha


Princetonspear.com

SPEAR Google Calendar

SPEAR on Twitter

SPEAR on Facebook

Get involved with SPEAR!


Comment

Comment

SPEAR Newsletter 3/3

Hi SPEARfam!!


Get ready for our busiest week yet this semester! SPEAR is sponsoring two amazing panels of activists this week, speaking about the disenfranchisement of incarcerated people on Tuesday and modern political prisoners on Saturday.


We would really appreciate your support at these events -- our organizing teams have worked so hard to make these events a reality and bring these pressing issues to the campus conversation. Each of these events include a link to a facebook event: please make sure to RSVP going and invite your friends! All of these events are also conveniently on our SPEAR calendar.


As always, SPEAR will have its weekly working full group meeting this Monday, March 4th at 8 p.m. in Campus Club. This week will feature a presentation (linked here) in collaboration with YDS members about who profits off of incarceration.


Our D.O.V.E.S. team, which hosts social and educational events for young women from a local alternative incarceration facility (and is looking for new members!) will meet at 7:30 p.m. in campus club, and our conference team meets at 11:30 on Sundays (reach out to Kiki for more details).


New to SPEAR? Fill out this onboarding guide to get fully plugged in to all things SPEAR and to schedule coffee with one of our presidents to talk about how you can get more involved!


Announcements


  1. Join SPEAR’s Voting Rights Campaign for Reclaim the Vote: A Discussion with Formerly Incarcerated People on Voting Rights and the Criminal Justice System, on March 5, from 6pm to 7:30 pm in McCormick 101. Nine formerly incarcerated impacted individuals will be holding a panel conversation on voting rights. 48 states in this country have collectively and historically denied the right to vote for over six million Americans who are incarcerated, on probation, or on parole. Join this panel in a discussion on felon disenfranchisement, voting as a right and responsibility, and tangible steps of change that you can take in fighting for democracy.

  2. Join SPEAR for a Conversation with the  Northeast Political Prisoner Coalition on Saturday afternoon, March 9th from 4 to 6pm about the history of oppression, incarceration, and the criminalization of black political expression. Learn from organizers with the Black Panthers and the Black Liberation Army about the political prisoners still held in the U.S. today and how you can support the campaign for their freedom today.

  1. Join PSRJ and SPEAR on Wednesday, March 6th for the amazing opportunity to hear Professor Leigh Anne Francis of TCNJ. She will speak about her important work with reproductive justice among low income Black women in the prison system from 5-6:30 p.m. in 219 Aaron Burr Hall, and the talk will include delicious juice and dessert from Nassau’s own Arlee’s Raw Blends.


  1. Registration is now open for our annual SPEAR Conference!!!! Hosted on April 12-13, this year’s conference will assess the mainstream criminal justice reform movement’s tendency to focus only on non-violent and drug offenses, often excluding those convicted of violent and sexual offenses from the movement. Princeton students should register for the conference here.

 

  1. On March 4th (this coming Monday), the Religious Life Council invites you to join us from 5:30 to 7:15 pm in the Murray Dodge lobby for a dinner on religious issues and experiences in prisons and detention centers. We have invited Reverend Maria Lopez, who will be giving a brief talk before we break into groups for dinner.

  2. The Wilson School and the ACLU of New Jersey are hosting We the People: A Conversation with the ACLU's executive director, Anthony Romero '87 on Monday, March 4th from 4:30 to 6 pm in Friend 101.

  3. Black Feminisms across the Americas: A Tribute to Political Activist Marielle Franco will take place on March 14, 2019 (1:45-4:30 pm), at the 399 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building. The symposium is being organized by the Brazil LAB, and will bring together Brazilian and U.S. critical thinkers and activists, culminating with a keynote address by Angela Davis at McCosh 10 (5:00-7:00 pm), and a follow-up discussion with students and faculty on March 15 (10:00am-2:00pm).


Headlines


I'm in Prison—And on HBO Theothus Carter, The Marshall Project.

Theothus Carter reflects on starring in the film “O.G.”, alongside Jeffrey Wright, while serving time in prison.


The Jail Health-Care Crisis Steve Coll, the New Yorker.

The opioid epidemic and other public-health emergencies are being aggravated by failings in the criminal-justice system.


SPEARlove,


Kiki, Amanda, and Masha


Princetonspear.com

SPEAR Google Calendar

SPEAR on Twitter

SPEAR on Facebook

Get involved with SPEAR!


Comment

Comment

SPEAR Newsletter 2/24

Hey SPEARfam!!


It’s hard to believe that we are already a quarter of the way through the semester! We are so proud of everything each team has accomplished so far, and we can’t wait for the amazing events and projects still to come.


As always, everyone is welcome at our weekly meeting this Monday, 2/25, at 8 p.m. in Campus Club! We guarantee you will leave having learned something and done something in just an hour!


Make sure to read this email carefully to keep track of all of the amazing events that we have coming up in the next two weeks! (But if you forget, everything is conveniently also in our events calendar! Which is also on our updated website!)


Announcements

  1. The Ban the Box Campaign and BlaQT are hosting a screening of "Out in the Night,” a documentary following the incarceration of the New Jersey 4, on February 28th at 8:30pm in the Wilson Black Box theater. After defending themselves from a harasser on the streets of New York, seven black and lesbian women were labeled a "gang" of "killer lesbians" by news outlets and prosecutors. Receiving sentences ranging from 3 1/2 to 11 years in prison, the documentary centers around how the sexuality and race of the women were associated with criminality during their trial and media representation. Join us for this powerful documentary showing and a post-showing discussion! RSVP to the facebook event here.


  1. On Wednesday, February 27 4:30 - 6 pm in Friend 006, the radical founder of Civil Rights Corps and friend of SPEAR Alec Karakatsanis will be giving a lecture on "The Bureaucracy of Human Caging." You can find more details about Alec and the event here.

    1. SCHEDULE CHANGE: SPEAR will be hosting a dinner with Alec on February 26th at 7 p.m. at Thai Village. This is an amazing opportunity to pick his brain about anything and everything related to his amazing work on impact litigation surrounding mass incarceration. Please RSVP for the dinner here, which will be subsidized by SPEAR.  

  2. Join SPEAR’s Voting Rights Campaign for Reclaim the Vote: A Discussion with Formerly Incarcerated People on Voting Rights and the Criminal Justice System, on March 5, from 6pm to 7:30 pm in McCormick 101. Nine formerly incarcerated impacted individuals will be holding a panel conversation on voting rights. 48 states in this country have collectively and historically denied the right to vote for over six million Americans who are incarcerated, on probation, or on parole. Join this panel in a discussion on felon disenfranchisement, voting as a right and responsibility, and tangible steps of change that you can take in fighting for democracy.

  3. Registration is now open for our annual SPEAR Conference!!!! Hosted on April 12-13, this year’s conference will assess the mainstream criminal justice reform movement’s tendency to focus only on non-violent and drug offenses, often excluding those convicted of violent and sexual offenses from the movement. Princeton students should register for the conference here.

  4. Our WEEKLY SOCIAL DINNER  will be this Thursday, 2/28, at 6pm in the Whitman Octagonal Private Dining Room. Come out to build community with your fellow SPEAR members from other committees!

Headlines

Princeton seminary student talks journey from prison to advocacy Claire Silberman, The Daily Princetonian

This piece profiles Erich Kussman, a formerly incarcerated student and social justice advocate at Princeton Theological Seminary, and founder of  Ransom Writers and Speakers, a support network that helps previously incarcerated individuals re-enter society.

Prisons Across the U.S. are Quietly Building Databases of Incarcerated People’s Voice Prints

George Joseph, Debbie Nathan, The Intercept.

“Prison authorities have quietly enrolled hundreds of thousands of incarcerated people’s voice prints into large-scale biometric databases...Some jurisdictions limit incarcerated people’s phone access if they refuse to enroll in the voice recognition system.”

Mexico to Close Infamous Island Penal Colony, Region's Last AP, The New York Times.

“Mexico will close its infamous Isla Marias prison, the last island penal colony in a hemisphere once dotted with remote island jails….”


SPEARlove,

Kiki, Masha, and Amanda


Princetonspear.com

SPEAR Google Calendar

SPEAR on Twitter

SPEAR on Facebook


Comment

Comment

SPEAR Newsletter 2/17

Hey SPEARfam!!

After an exciting week of concerts, conferences, and CPUC meetings, we are so excited to see y’all again on Monday at 8pm in Campus Club for our weekly meeting!

Our projects are doing so much amazing work to plan events in the next few weeks, so definitely check out SPEAR’s new public calendar to stay on top of everything happening in the next few weeks.

Announcements:

  1. The Ban the Box Campaign and BlaQT are hosting a screening of "Out in the Night,” a documentary following the incarceration of the New Jersey 4, on February 28th at 8:30pm in the Wilson Black Box theater. After defending themselves from a harasser on the streets of New York, seven black and lesbian women were labeled a "gang" of "killer lesbians" by news outlets and prosecutors. Receiving sentences ranging from 3 1/2 to 11 years in prison, the documentary centers around how the sexuality and race of the women were associated with criminality during their trial and media representation. Join us for this powerful documentary showing and a post-showing discussion!

  2. The campaign to free Xiyue Wang, a Princeton graduate student currently being held as a political prisoner in Iran, is holding two events on Wednesday, February 20 to raise awareness about Wang’s case and press the US government to take action. Wang traveled to Iran to conduct dissertation research, when he was wrongly accused of espionage and later imprisoned. The U.N. Working Group on Arbitrary Detention has condemned his imprisonment and called for his immediate release. As a Princeton community, we stand with Wang, his wife Hua Qu, and the couple’s young son to demand the same. The campaign will host a Call-A-Thon—contacting political representatives by phone and mail—from 10 am to 5 pm in the Campus Club Library. Food and coffee will be provided, as will postcards, stamps, and other necessary supplies. There will be a rally directly afterwards at 5pm in the Chancellor Green Rotunda, where we will hear speeches and observe a moment of silence for Wang and his family. Find the facebook event here.

  3. Our first WEEKLY SOCIAL DINNER  will be this Thursday, 2/ 21, at 6pm in the Wilson Private Dining Room. Come out to build community with your fellow SPEAR members from other committees!

  4. On Wednesday, February 27 4:30 - 6 pm in Friend 006, the radical founder of Civil Rights Corps and friend of SPEAR Alec Karakatsanis will be giving a lecture on "The Bureaucracy of Human Caging." You can find more details about Alec and the event here. SPEAR will be hosting a dinner with Alec afterwards at 6:30 where you can pick his brain about anything and everything related to his amazing work on impact litigation surrounding mass incarceration -- mark your calendars for this super exciting opportunity!

  5. First-years should consider applying for the Bogle Fellowships in Civic Service, a funded opportunity to design your own summer internship in service or civic engagement. The priority deadline is February 22nd: find application information here!

Headlines:

Police Policy for Sale Scott Morris, The Appeal

Lexipol, a private for-profit company, has quietly become one of the most powerful voices in law enforcement policymaking in the country, responsible for drafting policies authorizing ICE to detain people for suspected undocumented status, looser police use of force regulations, and limiting community oversight of police departments.

L.A. County will replace Men’s Central Jail with mental health hospital Maya Lau, L.A. Times

Los Angeles County supervisors narrowly approved a plan Tuesday to tear down the dungeon-like Men’s Central Jail downtown and build at least one mental health treatment facility in its place.

The surprisingly nomadic lives of prisoners. Byron Case, The Marshall Project.

Byron Case is serving life without parole in Missouri for murder, and here he disabuses us of the notion that most inmates endure years, or even decades, in a single cell. Instead, he writes, prison often is an endless series of sudden, surprise transfers, from one cell to another, or even one prison to another, often for no good reason. “We live like hermit crabs,” Case writes, “schlepping our stuff here and there.”

John Pfaff on Rethinking the Causes of Mass Incarceration

Just a great video on violence, the ideas of violent crime, and rethinking how we address mass incarceration that deserves more views!

SPEARlove,

Masha, Kiki, and Amanda

Comment