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Weekly Update 3/10

Hey SPEARfam!


What a week! We are so grateful to the incredible organizers who made so many incredible events happen this past week - from a moving panel of voting rights activists to a call to action to free the political prisoners still held captive in this country today to building community on campus and beyond, SPEAR members truly made an impact on the campus and state conversation this week.


As always, SPEAR will have its weekly working full group meeting this Monday, March 4th at 8 p.m. in Campus Club. Before breaking out in our projects to continue building our campaigns, we will take a little time to acknowledge the need for self care by writing encouraging mid-terms notes to our friends.



Our D.O.V.E.S. team, which hosts social and educational events for young women from a local alternative incarceration facility (and is looking for new members!) will meet at 7:30 p.m. in campus club, and our conference team meets at 11:30 on Sundays (reach out to Kiki for more details).


New to SPEAR? Fill out this onboarding guide to get fully plugged in to all things SPEAR and to schedule coffee with one of our presidents to talk about how you can get more involved!


  1. Please come out the Monday after Spring Break, 3/25, at 4:20 pm in Betts Auditorium (in the architecture building) for the penultimate CPUC meeting of the semester! We need your support to continue pressuring the administration and show them that we have not forgotten about their hostile responses to the Ban the Box campaign. This meeting, engaged faculty will also be asking questions to demonstrate that the campaign is building momentum and has wide support across campus.  Previous demonstrations have garnered the attention of national media and provoked discussions among high level administrators, so your presence matters! Contact Michaela (msdaniel@princeton.edu) and Gina (gmfeliz@princeton.edu) with any questions.

  2. Black Feminisms across the Americas: A Tribute to Political Activist Marielle Franco will take place on March 14, 2019 (1:45-4:30 pm), at the 399 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building. The symposium is being organized by the Brazil LAB, and will bring together Brazilian and U.S. critical thinkers and activists, culminating with a keynote address by Angela Davis at McCosh 10 (5:00-7:00 pm), and a follow-up discussion with students and faculty on March 15 (10:00am-2:00pm).

  1. Registration is now open for our annual SPEAR Conference!!!! Hosted on April 12-13, this year’s conference will assess the mainstream criminal justice reform movement’s tendency to focus only on non-violent and drug offenses, often excluding those convicted of violent and sexual offenses from the movement. Princeton students should register for the conference here.

Headlines:

Formerly incarcerated speakers advocate for the voting rights of the incarcerated in a SPEAR organized panel Marie-Rose Sheinerman, The Daily Princetonian.

“I have experienced the extremes of what it means to be a citizen,” he said. “As a combat veteran, I was highly esteemed by society, and then as an incarcerated person, I essentially had my humanity stripped [from] me.”

Reckoning With Violence Michelle Alexander, The New York Times.

“We must face violent crime honestly and courageously if we are ever to end mass incarceration and provide survivors what they truly want and need to heal…. imprisonment isn’t just an inadequate tool; it’s often enormously counterproductive — leaving survivors and their communities worse off.”

‘What Would I Have Done if I Would Have Killed Her That Night?’ Ten months in a class for men who hit women. Lauren Justice, The New York Times.

“What would happen if men were encouraged to challenge their belief systems about women and relationships, power and control before they were forced to by a 911 call?”

The Opioid Crisis Isn’t White Abdullah Shihipar, The New York Times.

“Labeling the opioid crisis as “white” risks overlooking the very real damage experienced by black, Latino and Native American communities….This crisis is a reminder that anyone can become addicted to drugs. Our empathy should not be conditional.

Would Expanded Criminal Background Checks Hurt Federal Job Applicants? Justin George, The Marshall Project.

“The Trump administration wants applicants for federal jobs and contractor positions to divulge whether they have gone through diversion programs such as drug courts that are meant to help people avoid prison. But critics say the move undermines the whole idea of sentencing alternatives that are designed to keep permanent blemishes off participants’ records, avoiding negative background checks that can limit jobs, housing and education.”

‘You Have to Pay With Your Body’: The Hidden Nightmare of Sexual Violence on the Border Manny Fernandez, The New York Times.

“On America’s southern border, migrant women and girls are the victims of sexual assaults that most often go unreported, uninvestigated and unprosecuted. Even as women around the world are speaking out against sexual misconduct, migrant women on the border live in the shadows of the #MeToo movement.”

Lynch Mobs Killed Latinos Across the West. Descendants Want It Known. Simon Romero, The New York Times.

“Descendants of lynching victims are now casting attention on one of the grimmest campaigns of racist terror in the American West: the lynching of thousands of men, women and children of Mexican descent from the mid-19th century until well into the 20th century.”

White Women Were Avid Slaveowners, a New Book Shows Parul Sehgal, The New York Times.

White slave-owning women were ubiquitous. Not only did they profit from, and passionately defend, slavery, but the institution “was their freedom.”

KiKi’s review: “Speaks on recognizing the power dynamics between groups that are both disempowered in their own ways, which I think is an important nuance!”

In Defense of Harvey Weinstein’s Harvard Lawyer Conor Friedersdorf, The Atlantic.
“These students might not realize it, but they are creating a disincentive for ambitious young legal academics to undertake the defense of any potentially controversial client, including indigent men who stand accused of rape or sexual assault. That raises the odds of wrongful convictions, especially among the poor.”

A Harvard Law School Professor Defends His Decision to Represent Harvey Weinstein  Isaac Chotiner, The New Yorker.

A Q&A with the Harvard Law professor on Harvey Weinstein’s defense team.


SPEARlove,


Kiki, Amanda, and Masha


Princetonspear.com

SPEAR Google Calendar

SPEAR on Twitter

SPEAR on Facebook

Get involved with SPEAR!


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SPEAR Newsletter 3/3

Hi SPEARfam!!


Get ready for our busiest week yet this semester! SPEAR is sponsoring two amazing panels of activists this week, speaking about the disenfranchisement of incarcerated people on Tuesday and modern political prisoners on Saturday.


We would really appreciate your support at these events -- our organizing teams have worked so hard to make these events a reality and bring these pressing issues to the campus conversation. Each of these events include a link to a facebook event: please make sure to RSVP going and invite your friends! All of these events are also conveniently on our SPEAR calendar.


As always, SPEAR will have its weekly working full group meeting this Monday, March 4th at 8 p.m. in Campus Club. This week will feature a presentation (linked here) in collaboration with YDS members about who profits off of incarceration.


Our D.O.V.E.S. team, which hosts social and educational events for young women from a local alternative incarceration facility (and is looking for new members!) will meet at 7:30 p.m. in campus club, and our conference team meets at 11:30 on Sundays (reach out to Kiki for more details).


New to SPEAR? Fill out this onboarding guide to get fully plugged in to all things SPEAR and to schedule coffee with one of our presidents to talk about how you can get more involved!


Announcements


  1. Join SPEAR’s Voting Rights Campaign for Reclaim the Vote: A Discussion with Formerly Incarcerated People on Voting Rights and the Criminal Justice System, on March 5, from 6pm to 7:30 pm in McCormick 101. Nine formerly incarcerated impacted individuals will be holding a panel conversation on voting rights. 48 states in this country have collectively and historically denied the right to vote for over six million Americans who are incarcerated, on probation, or on parole. Join this panel in a discussion on felon disenfranchisement, voting as a right and responsibility, and tangible steps of change that you can take in fighting for democracy.

  2. Join SPEAR for a Conversation with the  Northeast Political Prisoner Coalition on Saturday afternoon, March 9th from 4 to 6pm about the history of oppression, incarceration, and the criminalization of black political expression. Learn from organizers with the Black Panthers and the Black Liberation Army about the political prisoners still held in the U.S. today and how you can support the campaign for their freedom today.

  1. Join PSRJ and SPEAR on Wednesday, March 6th for the amazing opportunity to hear Professor Leigh Anne Francis of TCNJ. She will speak about her important work with reproductive justice among low income Black women in the prison system from 5-6:30 p.m. in 219 Aaron Burr Hall, and the talk will include delicious juice and dessert from Nassau’s own Arlee’s Raw Blends.


  1. Registration is now open for our annual SPEAR Conference!!!! Hosted on April 12-13, this year’s conference will assess the mainstream criminal justice reform movement’s tendency to focus only on non-violent and drug offenses, often excluding those convicted of violent and sexual offenses from the movement. Princeton students should register for the conference here.

 

  1. On March 4th (this coming Monday), the Religious Life Council invites you to join us from 5:30 to 7:15 pm in the Murray Dodge lobby for a dinner on religious issues and experiences in prisons and detention centers. We have invited Reverend Maria Lopez, who will be giving a brief talk before we break into groups for dinner.

  2. The Wilson School and the ACLU of New Jersey are hosting We the People: A Conversation with the ACLU's executive director, Anthony Romero '87 on Monday, March 4th from 4:30 to 6 pm in Friend 101.

  3. Black Feminisms across the Americas: A Tribute to Political Activist Marielle Franco will take place on March 14, 2019 (1:45-4:30 pm), at the 399 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building. The symposium is being organized by the Brazil LAB, and will bring together Brazilian and U.S. critical thinkers and activists, culminating with a keynote address by Angela Davis at McCosh 10 (5:00-7:00 pm), and a follow-up discussion with students and faculty on March 15 (10:00am-2:00pm).


Headlines


I'm in Prison—And on HBO Theothus Carter, The Marshall Project.

Theothus Carter reflects on starring in the film “O.G.”, alongside Jeffrey Wright, while serving time in prison.


The Jail Health-Care Crisis Steve Coll, the New Yorker.

The opioid epidemic and other public-health emergencies are being aggravated by failings in the criminal-justice system.


SPEARlove,


Kiki, Amanda, and Masha


Princetonspear.com

SPEAR Google Calendar

SPEAR on Twitter

SPEAR on Facebook

Get involved with SPEAR!


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SPEAR Newsletter 2/24

Hey SPEARfam!!


It’s hard to believe that we are already a quarter of the way through the semester! We are so proud of everything each team has accomplished so far, and we can’t wait for the amazing events and projects still to come.


As always, everyone is welcome at our weekly meeting this Monday, 2/25, at 8 p.m. in Campus Club! We guarantee you will leave having learned something and done something in just an hour!


Make sure to read this email carefully to keep track of all of the amazing events that we have coming up in the next two weeks! (But if you forget, everything is conveniently also in our events calendar! Which is also on our updated website!)


Announcements

  1. The Ban the Box Campaign and BlaQT are hosting a screening of "Out in the Night,” a documentary following the incarceration of the New Jersey 4, on February 28th at 8:30pm in the Wilson Black Box theater. After defending themselves from a harasser on the streets of New York, seven black and lesbian women were labeled a "gang" of "killer lesbians" by news outlets and prosecutors. Receiving sentences ranging from 3 1/2 to 11 years in prison, the documentary centers around how the sexuality and race of the women were associated with criminality during their trial and media representation. Join us for this powerful documentary showing and a post-showing discussion! RSVP to the facebook event here.


  1. On Wednesday, February 27 4:30 - 6 pm in Friend 006, the radical founder of Civil Rights Corps and friend of SPEAR Alec Karakatsanis will be giving a lecture on "The Bureaucracy of Human Caging." You can find more details about Alec and the event here.

    1. SCHEDULE CHANGE: SPEAR will be hosting a dinner with Alec on February 26th at 7 p.m. at Thai Village. This is an amazing opportunity to pick his brain about anything and everything related to his amazing work on impact litigation surrounding mass incarceration. Please RSVP for the dinner here, which will be subsidized by SPEAR.  

  2. Join SPEAR’s Voting Rights Campaign for Reclaim the Vote: A Discussion with Formerly Incarcerated People on Voting Rights and the Criminal Justice System, on March 5, from 6pm to 7:30 pm in McCormick 101. Nine formerly incarcerated impacted individuals will be holding a panel conversation on voting rights. 48 states in this country have collectively and historically denied the right to vote for over six million Americans who are incarcerated, on probation, or on parole. Join this panel in a discussion on felon disenfranchisement, voting as a right and responsibility, and tangible steps of change that you can take in fighting for democracy.

  3. Registration is now open for our annual SPEAR Conference!!!! Hosted on April 12-13, this year’s conference will assess the mainstream criminal justice reform movement’s tendency to focus only on non-violent and drug offenses, often excluding those convicted of violent and sexual offenses from the movement. Princeton students should register for the conference here.

  4. Our WEEKLY SOCIAL DINNER  will be this Thursday, 2/28, at 6pm in the Whitman Octagonal Private Dining Room. Come out to build community with your fellow SPEAR members from other committees!

Headlines

Princeton seminary student talks journey from prison to advocacy Claire Silberman, The Daily Princetonian

This piece profiles Erich Kussman, a formerly incarcerated student and social justice advocate at Princeton Theological Seminary, and founder of  Ransom Writers and Speakers, a support network that helps previously incarcerated individuals re-enter society.

Prisons Across the U.S. are Quietly Building Databases of Incarcerated People’s Voice Prints

George Joseph, Debbie Nathan, The Intercept.

“Prison authorities have quietly enrolled hundreds of thousands of incarcerated people’s voice prints into large-scale biometric databases...Some jurisdictions limit incarcerated people’s phone access if they refuse to enroll in the voice recognition system.”

Mexico to Close Infamous Island Penal Colony, Region's Last AP, The New York Times.

“Mexico will close its infamous Isla Marias prison, the last island penal colony in a hemisphere once dotted with remote island jails….”


SPEARlove,

Kiki, Masha, and Amanda


Princetonspear.com

SPEAR Google Calendar

SPEAR on Twitter

SPEAR on Facebook


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SPEAR Newsletter 2/17

Hey SPEARfam!!

After an exciting week of concerts, conferences, and CPUC meetings, we are so excited to see y’all again on Monday at 8pm in Campus Club for our weekly meeting!

Our projects are doing so much amazing work to plan events in the next few weeks, so definitely check out SPEAR’s new public calendar to stay on top of everything happening in the next few weeks.

Announcements:

  1. The Ban the Box Campaign and BlaQT are hosting a screening of "Out in the Night,” a documentary following the incarceration of the New Jersey 4, on February 28th at 8:30pm in the Wilson Black Box theater. After defending themselves from a harasser on the streets of New York, seven black and lesbian women were labeled a "gang" of "killer lesbians" by news outlets and prosecutors. Receiving sentences ranging from 3 1/2 to 11 years in prison, the documentary centers around how the sexuality and race of the women were associated with criminality during their trial and media representation. Join us for this powerful documentary showing and a post-showing discussion!

  2. The campaign to free Xiyue Wang, a Princeton graduate student currently being held as a political prisoner in Iran, is holding two events on Wednesday, February 20 to raise awareness about Wang’s case and press the US government to take action. Wang traveled to Iran to conduct dissertation research, when he was wrongly accused of espionage and later imprisoned. The U.N. Working Group on Arbitrary Detention has condemned his imprisonment and called for his immediate release. As a Princeton community, we stand with Wang, his wife Hua Qu, and the couple’s young son to demand the same. The campaign will host a Call-A-Thon—contacting political representatives by phone and mail—from 10 am to 5 pm in the Campus Club Library. Food and coffee will be provided, as will postcards, stamps, and other necessary supplies. There will be a rally directly afterwards at 5pm in the Chancellor Green Rotunda, where we will hear speeches and observe a moment of silence for Wang and his family. Find the facebook event here.

  3. Our first WEEKLY SOCIAL DINNER  will be this Thursday, 2/ 21, at 6pm in the Wilson Private Dining Room. Come out to build community with your fellow SPEAR members from other committees!

  4. On Wednesday, February 27 4:30 - 6 pm in Friend 006, the radical founder of Civil Rights Corps and friend of SPEAR Alec Karakatsanis will be giving a lecture on "The Bureaucracy of Human Caging." You can find more details about Alec and the event here. SPEAR will be hosting a dinner with Alec afterwards at 6:30 where you can pick his brain about anything and everything related to his amazing work on impact litigation surrounding mass incarceration -- mark your calendars for this super exciting opportunity!

  5. First-years should consider applying for the Bogle Fellowships in Civic Service, a funded opportunity to design your own summer internship in service or civic engagement. The priority deadline is February 22nd: find application information here!

Headlines:

Police Policy for Sale Scott Morris, The Appeal

Lexipol, a private for-profit company, has quietly become one of the most powerful voices in law enforcement policymaking in the country, responsible for drafting policies authorizing ICE to detain people for suspected undocumented status, looser police use of force regulations, and limiting community oversight of police departments.

L.A. County will replace Men’s Central Jail with mental health hospital Maya Lau, L.A. Times

Los Angeles County supervisors narrowly approved a plan Tuesday to tear down the dungeon-like Men’s Central Jail downtown and build at least one mental health treatment facility in its place.

The surprisingly nomadic lives of prisoners. Byron Case, The Marshall Project.

Byron Case is serving life without parole in Missouri for murder, and here he disabuses us of the notion that most inmates endure years, or even decades, in a single cell. Instead, he writes, prison often is an endless series of sudden, surprise transfers, from one cell to another, or even one prison to another, often for no good reason. “We live like hermit crabs,” Case writes, “schlepping our stuff here and there.”

John Pfaff on Rethinking the Causes of Mass Incarceration

Just a great video on violence, the ideas of violent crime, and rethinking how we address mass incarceration that deserves more views!

SPEARlove,

Masha, Kiki, and Amanda

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PRINCETON'S RESPONSE TO THE BAN THE BOX MOVEMENT

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It’s no small thing to throw the symbolic weight of Princeton University behind a cause. As such, it’s been deeply encouraging to see President Eisgruber’s recent advocacy on behalf of the trans community and his leadership in the university’s challenge against President Donald Trump’s DACA decision. President Eisgruber’s actions have shown that in some cases, he is willing to put resources and reputation on the line for justice, and that he is an effective advocate when he chooses to do so.

These developments make President Eisgruber’s recent statements on Students for Prison Education and Reform’s (SPEAR) Ban the Box campaign all the more disappointing. After a Council of the Princeton University Community (CPUC) presentation from several SPEAR members on Monday afternoon, President Eisgruber announced that he, as the final arbiter of whether the University bans the box, was largely opposed. 
The Ban the Box campaign at Princeton began in 2012, and asks the University to remove the question regarding an applicant’s criminal record from its application. Now that the Common App itself announced that it would be removing the box from its application altogether, it is an individual university’s decision whether to ask the question on its supplemental applications. 

Read the full op-ed to see SPEAR’S response: http://www.dailyprincetonian.com/article/2018/11/a-response-to-president-eisgruber-why-we-cant-reformulate-the-box

ALSO — Check out the recent press coverage about the Ban the Box efforts on campus:

Eisgruber argues against Ban the Box objectives at CPUC meeting:

http://www.dailyprincetonian.com/article/2018/11/michaels-cpuc

It’s time to Ban the Box:

http://www.dailyprincetonian.com/article/2018/11/its-time-to-ban-the-box


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Support the National Prison Strike!

Students for Prison Education and Reform (SPEAR) joins in solidarity with our incarcerated comrades striking across the country in the August 21 National Prison Strike. SPEAR seeks the dismantling of all structures that perpetuate racial and class oppression in the U.S. and globally, no more clearly apparent than in our system of prisons and policing. SPEAR wholeheartedly supports the demands of the National Prison Strike--which focus widely on prison conditions, voting rights, racial justice, and the ability of incarcerated people to organize and advocate for themselves--in recognition that the massive human suffering in cages must be alleviated even as we work together for the eventual dismantling of the carceral state.

Please read the demands and add your organization's name here. You can find a recent podcast about the upcoming strike here.  

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Joint Press Release: More Than 1,000 in NJ are in Solitary Confinement, New Data Shows on Heels of Christie’s Veto of Reform

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Joint Press Release: More Than 1,000 in NJ are in Solitary Confinement, New Data Shows on Heels of Christie’s Veto of Reform

More than 1,300 prisoners were in solitary confinement on any given day in New Jersey’s prisons and jails as recently as last December, according to new data released by human rights advocates. The release of these data, gathered by Students for Prison Education and Reform: Princeton (SPEAR), Solitary Watch, and the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, previews a solitary confinement report to be issued in 2017.

The release of this information, first published by The Marshall Project, comes on the heels of Governor Chris Christie’s veto of a bill that would have dramatically reformed solitary confinement in the state.

“If signed into law, the bill would have made New Jersey a leader in solitary confinement reform,” said Jean Casella, Co-Director of the national watchdog group Solitary Watch. “Instead, it now lags behind at least a dozen states that have made significant reductions in their solitary populations, including California, Colorado, and New York.”

These data directly contradict Christie’s assertion that segregation units were used “primarily” for medical or safety-related reasons, an erroneous argument his veto statement made to refute the demonstrable fact that isolation is used as a disciplinary measure.

 

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Mid-Summer Update: Coverage of The Admissions Opportunity Campaign

Hopefully everyone is having a great summer so far! The Admissions Opportunity Campaign Teach-In was recently covered in both Princeton Alumni Weekly and The Huffington Post. We find it extremely exciting and hopeful that even a few months after the event, individuals are continuing the conversation on removing these critical barriers to education. We hope to continue with the campaign and conversation during the upcoming school year. Stay tuned for more!

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Upcoming Events Week of April 27th

Students for Prison Education and Reform invites students to two amazing events happening this week. 

1. AOC Organizing Meeting Tomorrow (April 27th) at 8:00PM in the Frist MPR. 

Please join Students for Prison Education and Reform (SPEAR) in discussing the Admissions Opportunity Campaign— a campaign to increase access to education by eliminating questions regarding criminal histories in Princeton’s application process. This event will be a great opportunity to not only learn more about the issues surrounding the campaign, but also help to strategize the most effective way to go about organizing the teach-in that will be held on May 7th. 

2. Jobs in Justice Tuesday April 28th at 7:00PM

Please join Students for Prison Education and Reform (SPEAR) for a panel discussion with five Woodrow Wilson M.P.A. students who have held jobs in the criminal justice system. The panelists have experience in managing grants, investigating for public defenders, fundraising, and drug policy reform. They will offer advice to students who are interested in pursuing similar paths, and discuss the opportunities and challenges involved. The event is co-sponsored by Career Services.

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SPEAR Conference April 10th-12th

This upcoming weekend, April 10th-12th, SPEAR will hosts its second annual conference. 

The first two days of the conference, April 10th and 11th, will offer opportunities for attendants to learn and engage in dialogues focused on criminal justice reform and prison education in the United States. 

On the third day, April 12th, SPEAR will host a private student-only summit  aimed at planning the national launch of the campaign to remove all questions related to past involvement with the justice system from university admissions applications. 

Some highlights of the conference will include a screening of Dead Man Walking, the 1995 film staring Sean Penn and Susan Sarandon, followed by a talk by Sister Helen Prejean, author of the book that served as the basis for the film; and a talk by Rabia Chaudry, a lawyer and activist in the Muslim community, who will speak about issues within the criminal justice system. Ms. Chaudry recently gained widespread attention for her role in the creation of the 2014 podcast series Serialwhich examines circumstances surrounding a life sentence handed down to 17-year-old Adnan Syed despite a lack of viable evidence. 

The conference will also feature a variety of additional panels and workshops. The panels will allow experts to share their experiences with and/or research on the status quo of the criminal justice system as well as possible routes towards reform. The workshops will allow participants and assembled experts to meaningfully engage in discussions about the system and share tactics for fostering change a local, state and national level.

If you would like to register for the conference, please visit: http://princetonspear.com/registration-princeton/.  Note that registration does not bind you to attend all sessions, but is simply to get a sense of  how many Princeton students we should expect at the conference for room scheduling purposes. Also, there will be a catered banquet for student participants on Saturday, April 11 at 7:00pm. Please RSVP to reserve your spot if you are free.

If you have any questions regarding the event or SPEAR, do not hesitate to contact us at spear.princeton@gmail.com.

 Tentative Schedule

FRIDAY, APRIL 10 - LEWIS LIBRARY 120

3:00-5:00: Screening of “Dead Man Walking"

5:30-7:00: Talk and Audience Discussion with Sister Helen Prejean

 

SATURDAY, APRIL 11 - WHIG HALL

 9:00-10:30: Panel: Reversing the School to Prison Pipeline

10:30-12:00: Workshops on:

Post-Release College Programs

High School Equivalency Programs Inside Prisons

Inside-Outside Classes

12:00-1:30: Panel: Fostering Reform Through Journalism

1:30-3:00: Workshops on: 

Stigma of Mental Health in the Black Community

Solitary Confinement as Mass Torture

Racial Protest in the Digital Age

The Language of Prison Reform

3:00-4:30: Panel: Mental Health and Mass Incarceration

  • Dr. Elizabeth Ford, Executive Director of Mental Health—NYC Correctional Health Services
  • Johnny Perez, Safe Reentry Advocate at the Urban Justice System

4:30-6:00: Talk and Audience Discussion with Rabia Chaudry, J.D.

 

SUNDAY, APRIL 12

All day: Private sessions to organize the national Abolish the Box campaign. All students and recent graduates are welcome to attend. For more information about the Sunday session, please contact Joel Simwinga at simwinga@princeton.edu.

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The wHole Premier Screening and Talk-Back

the wHole

On Monday, March 23rd, SPEAR will shake up its weekly meeting by hosting the premier screening of The wHole, a short anti-solitary confinement web series. The screening will be followed by a talk-back with show creator Ramon Hamilton. It'll be a great chance to learn about solitary confinement and the use of media in anti-prison advocacy. 

If you want to learn more about The wHole, you can check out Vice News' Feature of Ramon and the wHole here:

http://www.vice.com/read/how-did-an-la-film-crew-end-up-behind-bars-in-portland-1119

In addition, you can view the wHole website here: 

http://www.thewholeseries.com/#!press/c1fl4

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